Right of Way Defensive Driving Class Topics

Defensive Driving and Intersection Collisions

Defensive Driving and Right-of-Way

While many issues such as right-of-way, stops and signals have already been discussed in prior sections, here is a review and additional laws to obey when approaching an intersection.

Right-of-way is the legal right to use a particular piece of land for a specific purpose. When two vehicles approach an intersection at the same time, the driver with the right-of-way is the one who can proceed without having to yield to oncoming traffic. There are a few different scenarios in which a driver may have the right-of-way: - If there is a stop sign or yield sign at the intersection, the driver must stop or yield before proceeding. - If there is a green light, the driver can proceed through the intersection. - If there is a red light, the driver must stop at the line before the intersection. In the event that two drivers have the right-of-way, the one who is going straight has the right-of-way over the one who is turning. If both drivers are turning, the one who is turning left has the right-of-way over the one who is turning right. If a driver does not have the right-of-way, he or she must yield to oncoming traffic. Failing to yield can result in a traffic ticket or, in more severe cases, an accident.

 

Intersection Traffic Control - Texas DOT Website

  • If your vehicle is facing a circular green signal and other vehicles and pedestrians have cleared, you may proceed straight, turn right or turn left, unless there is a sign prohibiting the turn.
  • When facing a green arrow signal, you may cautiously enter the intersection to move in the direction permitted by the arrow. You must yield the right-of-way to a pedestrian lawfully in an adjacent crosswalk and other traffic lawfully using the intersection. 

Intersections and Right-of-Way

Right-of-way at intersections is a vital part of keeping traffic flowing smoothly and keeping drivers safe. It is important to know who has the right-of-way, and how to yield properly. When two vehicles approach an intersection at the same time, the driver of the car on the left must yield to the driver on the right. The driver on the right has the right-of-way. If there is a stop sign or stop light at the intersection, the vehicle must come to a complete stop before proceeding. The driver must yield to any pedestrians who are crossing the street. If you are turning left at an intersection, you must yield to oncoming traffic. Oncoming traffic has the right-of-way. If you are unsure who has the right-of-way, it is always best to yield. When in doubt, let the other driver go first. By following these simple rules of right-of-way, you can help keep traffic flowing smoothly and help prevent accidents.

It's important to know who has the right-of-way at an intersection, because if you don't, you could end up in a serious accident. There are a few different scenarios that can play out at an intersection, and each one has its own set of rules. If there is a stop sign or a yield sign at the intersection, then the driver who reaches the intersection first has the right-of-way. If two drivers reach the intersection at the same time, then the driver on the right has the right-of-way. If there are no stop signs or yield signs, then the driver who is going straight has the right-of-way over a driver who is turning. If two drivers are turning in the same direction, then the one on the right has the right-of-way. If you're ever unsure who has the right-of-way, the best thing to do is to yield to the other driver. It's better to be safe than sorry.